Expressing gratitude to our troops and their families.

Anton Rasmussen Marine Corps

Everyone knows Anton Rasmussen

Don’t let the baby face in the picture fool you. He is in Marine boot camp. A high calling, maybe the highest you can reach.

He entered the Corps September 4, 1942. Anton and dozens of other new Marines were trained on the parade ground and sandy beach at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in San Diego.

Anton RasmussenHe served in the Pacific Islands of Roi Namur, in the Marshalls. Tinian and Saipan in the Marianas, and Iwo Jima, a home island of Japan. During many experiences, he realized God was trying to get his attention. Anton is a Born Again believer in Jesus Christ.

He received the Marine Commendation Medal from General Clifton Cates, the 19th Commandant of the Marine Corps and a hero of Iwo Jima.

Anton Rasmussen served four years fighting the Japanese in the Pacific Islands, during World War II.

Anton was a forward observer and his radio man was a Cherokee Pawnee Indian named Jack Bowman from Oklahoma. He earned the rank of Sergeant.

Anton Rasmussen was standing 15 feet behind Joe Rosenthal when the U.S. Marines raised the American flag over Mount Suribachi on the Pacific Island of Iwo Jima, Feb. 23, 1945. The photograph won the Pulitzer prize in 1945. It won the hearts of Americans. Admiral Chester Nimitz said of the Marines on Iwo Jima, “Uncommon valor was a common virtue.”

Photograph by Joe Rosenthal
Photograph by Joe Rosenthal

He was discharged November 13, 1946, the war was over and the Marines were headed home.

Anton moved to Spokane, entered Eastern Washington State College in 1951, receiving a teaching degree, then taught and coached in Chewelah, WA. In 1955 he was hired at Central Valley High, as Coach/Teacher. In 1962 he became Vice Principal, retiring from CV in 1981.

He married Evelyn Kincaid in 1947. He and his late wife have four children, Lynn, Steve, Gary and Ann. He was elected to the CV “Wall of Fame” in 2008.

He and his wife Margaret live in Liberty Lake, WA.